New York Mets 2021 Top 50 Fantasy Prospects

A look into the newly depleted New York Mets farm system for 2021

With the beginning of the Steve Cohen era in Queens, the Mets fan base can start to forget about the scars left from the Jarred Kelenic trade. The system took a significant hit when the Mets traded for Francisco Lindor and Carlos Carrasco, but I think Mets fans are happy to be in the minority of teams who are actually trying to get better.

I wouldn’t classify this system as one of the better ones in baseball. The recent and not-so-recent losses of Jarred Kelenic, Isaiah Greene, Josh Wolf and Andres Gimenez would have likely pushed this system into the upper third of the league if they were all still present. However, the point of playing baseball (and fantasy baseball) is to win. That often means trading some of the future for established value in the present.

Keep an eye on who the Mets bring into this system during the new J15 international period. As of now, Baseball America has the Mets slated to go with a quantity over quality approach by signing several players to deals over $100,000 without cracking the million dollar mark on any one player. Personally, with the amount of talent coming out of the international market these days it can be smart to grab as many talented youngsters as possible instead of throwing all of your bonus pool into one uber-prospect. Ronald Acuna Jr. only signed for $100,000 dollars as a 16 year old. But enough of this! Let’s get to the top 50. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to me @CavghtLooking on Twitter.

Note: These Top 50 lists are all done through a fantasy baseball-focused lens. Many players who are ranked higher or lower on other platforms will get a boost here. For example, players who profile as middle relievers or glove-first infielders likely won’t have much fantasy relevance, so they won’t be ranked as highly. 

1. Ronny Mauricio – SS

Age: 20
Highest Level: A-Ball

Ronny Mauricio is one of those prospects who is all projection at the moment. The prospect world was chomping at the bit to see what the Mets #1 would do in 2020, but, as we all know, 2020 didn’t go as planned. Mauricio is a classic case of why we can’t rely on stats alone when evaluating prospects. His numbers so far won’t jump off the page, but it is important to note that he has been roughly three years younger than his competition at every level in his professional career. With that context in mind, Mauricio held his own in the GCL in 2018, showing off decent bat-to-ball skills with an average fly ball distance over 280 feet. The body is wiry at present, but he has a frame that can add good weight which should allow him to unlock his power potential as he matures through the minor leagues. Mauricio has decent wheels, but so far has been a lost soul when attempting to steal, getting caught 16 times in 24 attempts so far in his minor league career. If he adds weight he will lose some of the speed he has at present, so I wouldn’t expect him to grow into a base stealer at this time. Mauricio hits with an aggressive approach, evidenced by his ~4.5% walk rate, and will need to learn to command the strike zone better if he ever hopes to be a true force at the dish. If the Mets end up signing Lindor to a multi-year deal, Mauricio will likely have to move over to third base in the future. Where the Mets choose to send him this spring will be a good indication of how his 2020 development is perceived by the organization. Regardless, 2021 will be a great litmus test for Mauricio’s future outcome. Keep a close eye on this one.

ETA: 2022

2. Francisco Alvarez – C

Age: 19
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

I was tempted to rank Francisco Alvarez as the top prospect for the Mets. Unfortunately, catching prospects are just too volatile and Mauricio’s scouting reports too glowing to push “The Thing” up that high. However, the potential ceiling on Alvarez is somewhere between the moon and Jupiter. At just 17 years young, Alvarez posted a triple slash of .312/.407/.512 across two levels of rookie ball where he was much younger than all of his competition. It will take a while for Alvarez to arrive, but a switch to a robotic strike zone could speed his arrival if the catcher position suddenly requires zero framing work. I wrote about Alvarez when writing about the free agency of J.T. Realmuto, claiming that signing James McCann would be a better move for the Mets and signal a big vote of confidence in Alvarez’s future spot behind the dish at Citi Field. Well, in the words of Ray Butler of prospects365.com, when an organization tells you how they feel about a prospect, listen. Alvarez has already shown the ability to walk at an above average rate (11%+), impact the baseball (17 XBH in 42 games), and limit strike outs. The bat looks like a good bet to play no matter where he lands on the diamond, but let’s hope his world-class work ethic gives him the chance to stick behind the plate.

ETA: 2023

3. Pete Crow-Armstrong – OF

Age: 18
Highest Level: Drafted 19th Overall in 2020

Pete Crow-Armstrong is easily one of my favorite players from the 2020 draft class. He can play above-average defense in center field, has a nice compact swing, and projects to be a threat on the base paths. PCA posted exit velocities up to 99 mph, putting him in the 98th percentile for the high school/prep class of 2020. Risk abounds with prep bats, but PCA has handled himself well against some advanced competition playing for the U-18 USA National team where he hit .364/.405/.606 across nine games. It will likely take several years for him to arrive, but the strong defense in center field could get him to the majors quicker than your average prep hitter. There’s a chance for PCA to develop into a 20/20 threat at peak, an outcome that would be a welcome sight for Mets fans.

ETA: 2024

4. Matthew Allan – RHP

Age: 19
Highest Level: Low-A

Drafted in the third round of the 2019 draft, Matthew Allan has done nothing but impress since his debut. Sporting a mid-90s fastball with armside run, a high-rev (2500 rpm) curveball, and a developing changeup, Allan cut apart the New York Penn League before being promoted to Low-A to end the year. What the 2019 statline doesn’t show are the five perfect innings Allan threw in the Low-A playoffs. Prep pitchers come with a healthy amount of risk, but if Allan can avoid serious injury and develop his changeup to average or above-average he has a shot at turning himself into a decent Sp3. Should I mention the 17 strikeout perfect game his threw as a senior in high school? I guess it couldn’t hurt. The reports on Allan’s makeup and polish are more positive than your average teenager, giving me reason to believe in his ability to develop that third pitch and keep him in the rotation long term. He will need to shore up his control as he ages (4+ BB/9 in 2019) in order to fully reach his potential, but the future is bright for Allan and he should head to A-Ball to begin 2021.

ETA: 2023

5. David Peterson – LHP

Age: 25
Highest Level: MLB

David Peterson is one out away from graduating off this list. His debut for the Mets was relatively promising for a prospect slated to max out as an SP4 or SP5. The statcast numbers are a little “meh,” but they aren’t bad for a reliable innings eater. Peterson limits hard contact well enough despite not having much spin to speak of on his fastball. However, his slider is a true swing and miss pitch, generating a whiff rate of 37.1% with an xWOBA of just .212. Peterson has the durability, pitch mix, and frame (6’4″, 240lbs) of a starter, so the Mets will likely let him continue to start moving forward. If Peterson can reduce his BB% back down to the levels he showed in the minors (~6-7%), that will really help him limit the amount of runs he gives up via the long ball, a trend that started to appear as he faced better competition in AA and the MLB. What we have in Peterson is probably a solid contributor who tops out as an above-average streaming option in standard mixed leagues.

ETA: Arrived

6. Brett Baty – 3B/1B

Age: 21
Highest Level: Low-A

Brett Baty is a curious prospect. When he was drafted out of high school he was already 19 years old. Baty’s calling card is his big raw power and turning that raw power into game power will be what allows him to get to the majors, or what holds him back. His swing looks quiet and controlled from the left side, but he did struggle with swings and misses in his debut season, tallying 65 strikeouts in only 51 games. Reports are that he has good pitch recognition and a strong arm, but will likely end up in the outfield long term as he adds more weight to his 6’3″ frame. I will be watching the whiffs for him in 2021 with Baty breath.

ETA: 2023

7. Mark Vientos – 3B

Age: 21
Highest Level: A-Ball

Mark Vientos is another power-over-hit prospect for the Mets, similar to Baty, but from the right side. The biggest difference between the two is that Vientos’ hit-tool grades out lower than Baty’s in terms of potential. However, Vientos has showed a lot more success so far in his minor league career, compiling 40 XBH in 111 games at A-Ball in 2019. I am a little concerned about the severe drop in his BB% with a correlating uptick in K% at his last stop in the minors. That said, reports from the alternate site were good for Vientos, praising him for his strength training during the lockdown and his power potential moving forward. Getting an extended taste against some advanced pitching might be just what the doctor ordered for his development. The Mets should start him at AA to begin the 2021 season and it will be fun to see how much he can tap into that raw power against much better pitching.

ETA: 2023

8. J.T. Ginn – RHP

Age: 21
Highest Level: NCAA

J.T. Ginn has had the pedigree for a while now. He was drafted 30th overall by the Dodgers in 2018 before deciding to honor his commitment to Mississippi St. After a dominant season in 2019 where Ginn gave up just one home run and struck out 111 batters in 86.1 innings, Tommy John came calling for him in 2020 before the season was cancelled. When healthy, Ginn pumps in a mid-90s fastball with good movement and a devastating slider. Development of a third pitch will be key to keeping Ginn in the rotation long term, but the floor seems to be at least a high-leverage reliever with closer potential if the arsenal doesn’t develop.

ETA: 2023

9. Thomas Szapucki – LHP

Age: 24
Highest Level: AA

Thomas Szapucki is a pitcher who just has not been able to stay healthy in his career. When you look at all of his minor league numbers compiled together, the numbers are quite impressive. With a 2.42 ERA and 188 strikeouts across 145 innings, the only thing holding Szapucki back is the ability to stay on the field. The highest number of innings that Szapucki has been able to put up in any year is 61.2. The curveball is his calling card, but I think the future for Szapucki is in the bullpen, which would tank his value somewhat.

ETA: 2022

10. Freddy Valdez – OF

Age: 23
Highest Level:

Freddy Valdez was signed by the Mets for $1.4 million in the 2018 J2 period and performed adequately in his professional debut. The Mets liked what they saw in 2019 enough to give him three games in the Gulf Coast League to finish the season and Valdez rewarded their faith with a home run. It’s best not to get carried away with numbers from the DSL, but Valdez showed the ability to walk, hit for contact, and impact the ball (23 XBH in 57 games) in his inaugural season. Valdez is a big lad (6’3″ 210lbs), so it will be important to note how his body matures (or doesn’t) going forward.

ETA: 2024

11. Alexander Ramirez – OF

Age: 17
Highest Level: N/A

Alexander Ramirez gets this ranking simply on pedigree. He was signed by the Mets for $2.1 million during the J2 period of 2019. Rated as the 26th overall player for that class by MLB Pipeline, reports are that he has the ability to stick in center field and already has an advanced approach and feel for hitting. If he can stick in center field that means he is an athlete. That is enough for me to put him on your radar here.

ETA: 2025

12. Junior Santos – RHP

Age: 19
Highest Level: Rookie Ball 

Junior Santos is a 6’8″, 218 pound monster of a teenager. If he can figure out how to harness his size and gain some more feel for his secondary offerings he can absolutely make it as a starter. The stats won’t really tell you anything about his potential, so there is no need to go there (really, don’t look). Unlocking his value will come from maintaining his mid-90s heater and developing command (or at least control) of his full arsenal. Santos was pushed stateside when he was only 16, a fact that both speaks to what the Mets see in him and is cause for concern. Rushing a teenage arm can have dire consequences for a player’s mental toughness. All that said, you don’t give up on pitchers with a frame like Santos. Barring injury, Santos should at least be able to make it as a reliever, possibly even a high-end reliever, but there is a long way to go with this one so keep an eye on him and/or toss a dart at the end of an ocean-deep dynasty league.

ETA: 2024

13. Matthew Dyer – C/OF/1B

Age: 22
Highest Level: NCAA

Matthew Dyer was selected in the fourth round of the 2020 draft and signed to an underslot deal by the Mets. A tall (6’4″) and wiry player with a quick swing, Dyer posted an exceptional .393/.480/.571 triple slash playing for the University of Arizona in 2019. He played all around the diamond in college, but I think a permanent move to the outfield is the most likely outcome for him given the presence of Alvarez at catcher and Pete Alonso at first base. There is potential for Dyer to unlock more power if he can add good weight, a prospect that looks very possible when you watch him play. His turn in the Cape Cod League won’t inspire sonnets, but the swing and body portend well for his future. If it all breaks right he could be a decent third outfielder, but the more likely outcome is a utility player.

ETA: 2023

14. Robert Dominguez – RHP

Age: 19
Highest Level: NA

Robert Dominguez is a good example of how bizarre and unpredictable the market is for international teenagers. Signed out of the Dominican Republican (by way of Venezuala), Dominguez wasn’t highly rated as a 16 year old. Well, fast forward two years and Dominguez is throwing low-90s heat. After his move to the Dominican he touched 97. Once he started working with the Mets, he touched 99. We don’t have any stats to go off at the moment, but 99mph is more than enough to put him high on this list. The Mets could easily have found a diamond in the rough.

ETA: 2024

15. Michel Otanez – RHP

Age: 23
Highest Level: Low-A

Michel Otanez is another arm in the Mets’ system with an electric fastball and a desperate need for a third pitch. The heater sits in the mid-to-upper 90s, but Otanez struggles mightily to control it and really can’t rely on his changeup at all, making him a two-pitch hurler at present. The numbers he put in 2019 were solid over 14 starts (3.12 ERA with 70K in 63IP), but without the development of a third pitch he is destined for a bullpen role.

ETA: 2022

16. Adrian Hernandez – OF

Age: 20
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Adrian Hernandez is a small little tank of a player. A power-over-hit prospect, Hernandez has turned in some solid exit velocity numbers so far. He did tear his hamstring in 2019, so we will have to see if that affects his speed tool going forward. Power-over-hit prospects with strikeout issues in the lower minors do worry me. He’s likely a fourth outfielder, but there is a lot of time left in his development.

ETA: 2023

17. Carlos Cortes – 2B/OF

Age: 23
Highest Level: High-A

Carlos Cortes is another tank profile. At just 5’7″, 197 lbs, Cortes has shown the ability to impact the baseball so far in his minor league career. In the pitcher-friendly Florida State League in 2019, Cortes amassed 40 XBH for a WRc+ of 119. Cortes also improved both his BB% (9.9) and K% (14.6) at High-A, which is good because the bat will likely need to carry this profile moving forward. Currently playing in the Australian Baseball League, it will be interesting to see what kind of power numbers Cortes can put up in AA this season against stronger pitching. The Mets actually drafted Cortes out of high school, but he chose to take his talents to South Carolina for a couple of years before the Mets drafted him again. This is definitely one of the players in the Mets’ system who could enjoy a nice little breakout in 2021.

ETA: 2022

18. Daison Acosta – RHP

Age: 22
Highest Level: A-Ball

Daison Acosta is wiry pitcher with a decent fastball that tops out in the mid-90s for now. The Mets have, so far, employed as a starter, but once he got to the Sally League in 2019 his weak secondary pitches were tested (and were found lacking) by more advanced competition. My guess is that the Mets will attempt to maximize the effectiveness of his fastball and send him to the bullpen where a few more velocity ticks could provide a pathway to the majors at some point.

ETA: 2023

19. Shervyen Newton – SS

Age: 21
Highest Level: A

Shervyen Newton’s stock was rocketing up prospects list after back-to-back positive campaigns in 2017 and 2018, with 2018 coming stateside in the Appalachian League. Those two seasons seemed to indicate that Newton might have across the statline skills, but his promotion to the Sally League exposed some major flaws in his swing. Against tougher competition, Newton saw his previously great walk rate cut down by more than 50%. After multiple seasons with an OBP over .400, his triple slash after 109 games was a measly .209/.283/.330. Another season like 2019 and Newton’s prospect stock will be in free fall.

ETA: 2023 

20. Franklyn Kilome – RHP

Age: 25
Highest Level: MLB

Franklyn Kilome looks like a potential stud when all four of his pitches are working. Problem is, that magical synchronization hasn’t happened much in his career. Acquired from the Phillies in the Asdrubal Cabrera trade, the Mets seem more inclined to push Kilome to the bullpen to maximize his fastball and limit the potential damage caused by his below-average control. The MLB results in 2020 left a lot to be desired. Kilome was taken out of the yard five times in just 11 innings, walking nine batter in his four appearances. If his future with the Mets is a role in the bullpen, Kilome likely won’t return much fantasy value in his career.

ETA: Arrived

21. Jaylen Palmer – 3B/SS

Age: 20
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Jaylen Palmer was a 22nd round pick from the 2018 draft. A cold-weather prospect, Palmer has put up good numbers at both stops so far in his minor league career. The BABIPs at both stops were both over .430, so it is a little hard to get a feel for his true potential at this point. Cold weather prospects can take a bit longer to mature than players from places that can play baseball year round, so I won’t count Palmer out just yet. That said, his 39.1% strikeout rate in the Appalachian League is concerning and he will need to improve on that number going forward if he wants to have a shot at making the bigs.

ETA: 2023   

22. Ryley Gilliam – RHP 

Age: 24
Highest Level: AAA 

Ryley Gilliam was taken in the fifth round of the 2018 draft our of Clemson. A closer in college, the right-hander is short (5’10”) for a pitcher, but the doesn’t stop his fastball from topping out at 97mph. The Mets were aggressive with him in 2019, moving him up twice during the season, starting him out in High-A and ending his season at AAA. Gilliam handled the promotion to AA well, maintaining a K% north of 35% with a SwStr% of 13.4. The results at AAA were subpar, but he bounced back nicely in the Arizona Fall League by punching out 11 batters in nine innings. The Mets are going to need bullpen help as soon as 2021, and given how quickly they moved Gilliam through the system in 2019 there is a good chance we see him at Citi Field some time this season.

ETA: 2021

23. Scott Ota – OF 

Age: 23
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Scott Ota dominated the Horizon League in his senior season before being selected in the 10th round of the 2019 draft. Ota took his talents to the Appalachian League where he put up a solid .273/.355/.519 triple slash. Granted, Ota was old for the level and has a bit more polish on him after four seasons of college ball. He will be tested in 2021 and I don’t think the results are likely to inspire confidence in him going forward.

ETA: 2023

24. Jose Butto – RHP  

Age: 22
Highest Level: A

Jose Butto is another international arm that the Mets grabbed well after their 16th birthday. Butto was signed in 2017 as a 19 year old and promptly dominated his first two rookie ball stops. I am definitely encouraged by the 13.2 SwStr% and 6.6 BB% Butto turned in at A-ball in 2019, but he doesn’t have a strong third pitch and his velocity on the fastball sits in the low 90s. A move to the pen could add more life to the fastball and get him to the majors leagues on a faster timeline.

ETA: 2023

25. Blaine McIntosh – OF 

Age: 19
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

The Mets signed Blaine McIntosh away from a commitment to Vanderbilt when they took him in the 13th round of the 2019 draft. McIntosh is a big (6’4″ 180 lbs) hitter who is exceptionally raw at the moment. His debut wasn’t anything to write home about, but it’s way to early to let that be a concern.

ETA: 2024

26. Endy Rodriguez – C/OF/1B

Age: 20
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Catching prospects are always tricky to evaluate, and Endy Rodriguez is no exception. Rodriguez was used both as a catcher and an outfielder in 2019, and the results with the bat were solid. Both his BB% and K% are above average. My worry is that he was much more advanced than his competition in the Gulf Coast League and still showed very little over the fence power. His athleticism and contact abilities are exceptional, so there’s a good chance he shoots up this list with a positive 2021 season.

ETA: 2024

27. Andres Regnault – C

Age: 22
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Andres Regnault is a big dude with a big leg kick who has managed to hit a lot of home runs in his early minor league career. He’s done so without whiffing very much, which is unexpected given the leg kick. I doubt he sticks at catcher long term given the 251 pounds on his frame, but it will be telling to see where the Mets place him in 2021 and what position(s) he ends up playing most.

ETA: 2024

28. Luis Carpio – 2B/SS

Age: 23
Highest Level: AA

Luis Carpio is a little middle infielder with good contact skills and absolutely zero power. Decent speed and defense will help carry Carpio to a bench bat/defensive replacement type of role at the MLB level.

ETA: 2021

29. Tylor Megill – RHP

Age: 25
Highest Level: AA

Tylor Megill has been an effective hurler coming out of the bullpen and as a starter. He was a starter in JuCo before transferring to Arizona and being relegated to the bullpen. Megill throws across his body and generates a lot of spin on his fastball. The issue with Megill is that he, like so many Mets pitchers, lacks a quality third pitch. He is developing a changeup, but the pitches he throws more often than not are his fastball and slider. With the Mets looking to be competitive sooner rather than later, I think they push Megill back to the bullpen so that he can help the big club as soon as 2021.

ETA: 2021

30. Jefferson Escorcha – LHP

Age: 21
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Jefferson Escorcha is a solid lefty reliever that hasn’t missed enough bats and is significantly undersized for a pitcher (5’11”). The control numbers are also good, as Escorcha has been able to keep his walk rate around 5% for the last three seasons. His frame may make it difficult to crack the major league roster, but we will likely be able to answer that question with certainty after the 2021 assignment.

ETA: 2024 

31. Joshua Cornielly – RHP

Age: 20
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Highly athletic with a clean delivery, Joshua Cornielly has posted minimal walk rates with good strikeout numbers at every stop in his minor league career. He commands his changeup with precision and pairs it well with his fastball. He is a long way away, but there is legitimate MLB starter potential here.

ETA: 2023

32. Jace Beck – RHP

Age: 19
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Jace Beck is a giant man. Standing 6’9″ and weighing in at 200 pounds, Beck’s fastball velocity won’t dazzle you. A 90mph fastball looks a lot faster when it’s being thrown by someone who is as tall as Beck. The early returns in 2019 were solid, but keeping his massive frame healthy and consistent will be the challenge going forward.

ETA: 2023

33. Franklin Parra – LHP

Age: 21
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

The best way to describe the way Franklin Parra pitches would be effectively wild. Parra had a 34.5 SwStr% in 2019. Unfortunately, his walk rate came in at a whopping 18.2%. He can pretty clearly miss bats, but at this point he needs to really clean up his control in order to have a chance to move up through the minors.

ETA: 2023

34. Junior Tillen – SS

Age: 18
Highest Level: NA

Junior Tillen is a 2019 international signing with a profile that depends heavily on his offensive production. He likely won’t stay at short long term. Anytime I see an international signee touted for his offensive potential I want to put him on your radar.

ETA: 2025

35. Eric Santana – OF

Age: 18
Highest Level: NA

Another 2019 international signing, Eric Santana is lauded for his pure hitting ability. Whether or not he can develop power is yet to be seen, but I will take a teenager with a burgeoning hit tool any day of the week.

ETA: 2025 

36. Federico Polanco – 2B

Age: 19
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Federico Polanco turned in a nice little season in the Dominican League in 2019, showing off his command of the strikezone with a good BB% and K%. Polanco has some speed, but lacks power at present. His assignment and performance in 2021 will likely be a make or break season for him.

ETA: 2025

37. Jordany Ventura – RHP

Age: 20
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Jordany Ventura throws a three-pitch mix (FB, SL, CH) mix that he has struggled to control as he has developed. The walk rate fell to a respectable 5.8% in his time pitching in the Gulf Coast League in 2019. If he can continue that rate his future will be much brighter.

ETA: 2024

38. Jake Magnum – OF

Age: 25
Highest Level: Low-A

Jake Mangum turned in a solid albeit unspectacular career at Mississippi State. He possesses very little power and, at 25,  is unlikely to develop any. His calling cards are his contact skills and some ability to swipe bags, but his steal efficiency has been questionable his entire baseball career, even in college. He will need to get caught less and get on base more to have a shot at rising through the ranks before his speed tool declines.

ETA: 2023

39. Bryce Hutchinson – RHP

Age: 22
Highest Level: A-Ball

An imposing form (6’6″ 245 lbs) on the mound, Bryce Hutchinson has a mid 90s fastball and a slider that still needs a little more work. His other secondaries have so far lagged behind, and without development of anything beyond the fastball and slider he is destined for a bullpen role.

ETA: 2023

40. Stanley Consuegra – OF

Age: 20
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Stanley Consuegra lost of all 2019 to injuries, so the loss of the 2020 season hits especially hard for the 20 year old. There’s room to add some good weight to his frame, which could unlock some power. Consuegra will need to make more contact when he gets back into games in order to not be left behind by the organization.

ETA: 2025

41. Warren Saunders – INF

Age: 22
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Warren Saunders played every infield position but catcher in his 2019 debut. He showed good contact abilities in his first season, but was unable to really impact the ball at all. That will need to change if he wants to have a shot at anything becoming anything other than a utility player.

ETA: 2024

42. Joander Suarez – RHP

Age: 21
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

Joander Suarez has a solid arsenal with three pitches that all have the ability to become average offerings. The righty showed the ability to miss bats in his 2019 season, and there is room to add some more weight to his frame which could net him some extra velocity.

ETA: 2024

43. Eric Orze – RHP

Age: 23
Highest Level: NA

Cancer survivor Eric Orze was taken by the Mets in the fifth round of the 2020 draft and has a pretty nasty splitter in his arsenal. In college he showed good command while generating a decent amount of whiffs. He gave up far too many hits, but his splitter could give him a pathway to the majors.

ETA: 2023

44. Sam McWilliams – RHP

Age: 25
Highest Level: AAA

Signed by the Mets in November of 2020, Sam McWilliams was previously drafted by the Phillies and and has spent time in both the Diamondbacks and Rays organizations. His best attribute is likely his durability and innings-eater potential, making McWilliams a good spot starting option for the Mets should injuries strike down some of the MLB starters.

ETA: 2021

45. Tony Dibrell – RHP

Age: 25
Highest Level: AA

Tony Dibrell has a four-pitch mix that sports a fastball with some sink to it and sits in the low to mid-90s. The control is an issue, as Dibrell has walked far too many batter in his minor league career. The concerning trend is the simultaneous drop in his strikeout rate and increase in his walk rate as he has worked his way up to AA. He has a starter’s arsenal, but his control issues may push him to the bullpen.

ETA: 2022

46. William Lugo – SS

Age: 19
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

William Lugo was signed by the Mets for $475,000 and sent straight to the states for his debut. The results were not pretty, but any time you push a teenager aggressively you are risking a weak statline as you attempt to put him in front of stiffer competition. Keep an eye on this one in 2020, he could surprise.

ETA: 2025 

47. Cesar Loaiza – LHP

Age: 22
Highest Level: Rookie Ball

A lanky lefty with the ability to miss bats in between all of the walks he issues. The arm is live, but the control will hold him back if he can’t throw strikes.

ETA: 2024

48. Ali Sanchez – C

Age: 24
Highest Level: MLB

Ali Sanchez has the defense to continue to contribute at the major league level, but his bat won’t ever do damage.

ETA: Arrived

49. Jose Acuna – RHP

Age: 18
Highest Level: NA

Jose Acuna is a righty with a projectable frame and a fastball that has already touched 94. Currently he pairs a curveball and a changeup with the heater. The velocity at such a young age is a good thing to keep tabs on moving forward.

ETA: 2024

50. Patrick Mazeika – C

Age: 27
Highest Level: AA

Patrick Mazekia has been stalled out at AA for a couple of seasons now. The rare lefty catcher, Mazeika will need to show he has learned something in lockdown in order to become even a back-up in the majors.

ETA: 2022

 

Photos by Mark Goldman/Icon Sportswire | Design by Quincey Dong (@threerundong on Twitter)

Kyle Brown

You are reading words written by the #1 Gary Sheffield fan of all time. I live and breath baseball 24-7-365. There is no offseason. Raised on the Rochester Red Wings, forged in Sheff's raging fire of blistering bombs, and steeled by my love of the Pirates, I am here to cut through minor league flotsam and provide you all with deep analysis of emerging minor league stars, regulars, and role players. Follow me 20,000 leagues under the MLB to find your next dynasty all-stars.

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