Dynasty: St. Louis Cardinals’ 2020 Preseason Top 50 Prospects

Trevor Hooth walks us through the St. Louis Cardinals farm system.

The St. Louis Cardinals are notorious for their farm system consistently producing  solid MLB contributors. The top three players in the system are getting plenty of hype, but after that it’s names that might go unnoticed to the non-prospectors. Of all the lists I’ve done, it seems like the Cardinals are the most even spread out farm across all their levels. There isn’t a bunch of guys packed in one area, and almost impressively so considering the teams tendency to be aggressive with their prospects.

Note: These Top 50 lists are all done through a fantasy baseball-focused lens. Many players who are ranked higher or lower on other platforms will get a boost here. For example, players who profile as middle relievers or glove-first infielders likely won’t have much fantasy relevance, so they won’t be ranked as high.

 

1. Dylan Carlson, OF

 

Age: 21

Highest level: AAA

There’s little doubt that Dylan Carlson tops the list of Cardinal prospects in real life or for fantasy purposes. He posted a 20/20 season in 2019 and really proved his worth with the bat. The switch hitting son of a coach saw his prospect stock shoot up quickly and went from being a non-top 100 prospect to an arguable top 20 prospect in baseball in only a season. His only limitations are with the outfield logjam in St. Louis, but I’m personally getting as much Carlson stock as possible.

ETA: 2020

2. Nolan Gorman, 3B

 

Age: 19

Highest level: A+

On a real life list, I have Nolan Gorman at 3. But for fantasy purposes I’m willing to drool over that plus-plus raw power as a fantasy asset. There will always be a strikeout component to his game, but when he fully learns to tap into his power he will be a a really great fantasy player with a very good chance to stick at third base. He’s still pretty raw so he won’t be contributing in the MLB for a few years, but he is an advanced hitter who will have some very nice pop.

ETA: 2022

3. Matthew Liberatore, LHP

 

Age: 20

Highest level: A

Matthew Liberatore is the Cardinals newest prospect after trading away Randy Arozarena and Jose Martinez. Usually, Liberatore is 2nd in the system for me because of his big body and already deadly arsenal. That said, he looks like an SP3 on a first division team and his strikeouts might not be where fantasy owners want them to be. He’s still got fantastic upside and should be rostered in most dynasty leagues.

ETA: 2022

 

4. Zack Thompson, LHP

 

Age: 22

Highest level: A+

In terms of pure stuff, Zack Thompson was among the best in his draft class but injuries allowed him to fall to the Cardinals with the 19th overall pick in the 2019 draft. He is another lefty arm who can be a really good starter if the durability is there. In 15 innings of professional pitching in his draft year, Thompson struck out 23 batters. Small sample size and lower level, yes. But his stuff is for real and he could be very good if injuries don’t hold him back.

ETA: 2022

 

5. Andrew Knizner, C

 

Age: 24

Highest level: MLB

For the purposes of fantasy baseball, Andrew Knizner is next up. He’s a talented catcher who will be a solid hitter. I’m not sure he’s the best catching prospect in the system, but his proximity gives him extra value. That is not to knock his talent either. He’ll likely get regular at bats in Memphis, but his experience in the MLB means the Cardinals won’t be afraid to call on him if they need help at the position. The only question will be when does Yadier Molina give up the throne?

 

6. Elehuris Montero, 3B

 

Age: 21

Highest level: AA

Don’t let an injury-marred 2019 deter from Elehuris Montero and buy low if you can. This was the 2018 Midwest League MVP, he can still hit. He might not be a third baseman forever, but his swing is ever improving. He was most recently in the Arizona Fall League and his stock will rise when he starts to hit again, which will be 2020 should he be healthy. He was also added to the 40-man recently, signaling the team’s love of him as a prospect.

ETA: 2021

 

7. Ivan Herrera, C

 

Age: 19

Highest level: AA

That is a deceptive AA appearance because it was short and in 2018. Ivan Herrera spent 2019 at the A and A+ levels, but he is still potentially the most talented catching prospect in the Cardinals farm system. His game is still somewhat raw, but he’s young for his placement and he’s performing. This is a name that still is widely unknown outside of prospect nerds and Cardinal fans, so he’s certainly worth grabbing if you can get him cheap.

ETA: 2022

 

8. Jhon Torres, OF

 

Age: 19

Highest level: A

There are some who might be down on Jhon Torres because of his struggles during a short promotion to Peoria. And to be fair he did look over-matched. However, he’s still very young and his plus raw power is something to dream on based on his 6’4 frame. Frankly, his ceiling could be amazing but his floor is scary. He’s raw, but his power might be worth buying in to.

ETA: 2024

 

9. Génesis Cabrera, LHP

 

Age: 23

Highest level: MLB

Génesis Cabrera has an electric fastball, a dreamy breaking ball, and a changeup that can flash as a plus pitch. He’s another Cardinals lefty that could be very good. What holds him back is his inconsistency and spotty control. He might wind up a reliever, but if he figures things out there could be starter upside in him. It’s a cautious optimism with Cabrera on what he could be.

 

10. Justin Williams, OF

 

Age: 24

Highest level: MLB

The Rays were the team to give Justin Williams his first shot in the majors before dealing him to St. Louis in 2018. He hasn’t been back since. A TV punching incident held him out for part of the 2019 season, but there is some talent there. Proximity gives him a boost on these rankings because he could be contributing at any moment, but he might wind up another casualty of the outfield logjam.

 

11. Trejyn Fletcher, OF

 

Age: 18

Highest level: R

Here’s a super aggressive ranking for Trejyn Fletcher. No other list will, or should, put him this high. The reason I do is solely because of his fantasy potential. He is as raw as raw players can get, but he is also one of the most athletic. If it all clicks with him he could have above average power and speed, but betting on that if is up to the owner. I’m a risk taker in fantasy, but I am only watching him at the moment.

ETA: 2024

 

12. Junior Fernandez, RHP

 

Age: 22

Highest level: MLB

Junior Fernandez is another exciting and electric arm at the Cardinals disposal. His fastball gets close to 100 when he starts, but there is more reliever in him than I would like. That said, he has huge upside in a reliever role. His electric stuff, and the fact that he can be useful this year make him an interesting option. Alarmingly small sample size alerts, but he boasts a 12.34 K/9 in his 11.2 innings of work in the majors.

 

13. Angel Rondon, RHP

 

Age: 22

Highest level: AA

Over the last few years Angel Rondon has been putting himself on the prospect map, and in 2019 he was named the Cardinals MiLB Pitcher of the Year. He’s got a mid-90’s fastball and a nice curveball that he commands well and that is just half of his pitch mix. The other two aren’t as good yet, but Rondon certainly has the chance to remain a starter at the back end of a future St. Louis rotation and produce quality innings.

ETA: 2021

 

14. Edmundo Sosa, SS

 

Age: 23

Highest level: MLB

Defense is the calling card for Edmundo Sosa, but he seemed to take a step forward offensively in 2019. He’s gotten a couple of very short stints in the majors, but he’ll be hoping to stake claim of a longer chance during 2020. He might just be able to find time in a utility-type role, and if his bat plays then he can help in deep leagues this year.

 

15. Griffin Roberts, RHP

 

Age: 23

Highest level: A+

Griffin Roberts has had trouble getting his career going, in part due to the suspension he endured for marijuana. Let’s put that all behind us and talk about why I have a future closer so high here. His slider might be an 80-grade pitch. It’s nuts. Even his bad ones break more than an average pitch. So yeah, do what you want here, but I’m all aboard the Griffin Roberts hype-train.

ETA: 2021

 

16. Johan Oviedo, RHP

 

Age: 21

Highest level: AA

The size of Johan Oviedo, who is listed as 6’6″, 210 lbs, is what allow people to dream over what he could be.  His slider plays, but there have been reported inconsistencies in his velocity. If he can nail some of that down, there will be a chance for him to take a rotation job, but if not, he might be relegated to a bullpen role. He’s got the stuff to succeed there, but he’ll be more valuable to fantasy owners as a starter if everything clicks.

ETA: 2022

 

17. Luken Baker, 1B

 

Age: 22

Highest level: A+

One of the names who created the biggest buzz around himself in his draft year was Luken Baker. He hit .500 through his first eight games and received a quick call up to graduate from the Rookie Leagues. He’s got double plus raw power, but that will be one of the only things he brings to the table. There are still some strides that need to be made for that pop to manifest itself in games, but he is an exciting power threat going forward.

ETA: 2022

 

18. Jake Woodford, RHP

 

Age: 23

Highest level: AAA

Proximity considered, Jake Woodford should see time in St. Louis in 2020. He’s not going to stand out in any way, but he should eat innings for the Cardinals as a starting pitcher. There’s little potential for him as a reliever, so he will likely have to do what it takes to stick in a rotation to have a chance of fantasy relevancy. He is on the 40-man though, so his time will come.

ETA: 2020

 

19. Tony Locey, RHP

 

Age: 21

Highest level: A

I’m not sure that Tony Locey will ever be a starter, but he’s got a heck of a future in the bullpen. He was a 2019 third rounder and he’s got the ability to miss bats. There is still some things left to be desired in his control of a big fastball and potentially plus slider. However, that combination alone is enough to build on for Locey to have a potential prominent role in the back of a bullpen.

ETA: 2022

 

20. Mateo Gil, SS

 

Age: 19

Highest level: A+

This is another deceptive player in terms of his highest level. He did reach A+ in 2019, but only for six plate appearances. Mateo Gil has bloodlines and he’s very young, but he’s also raw. He’s athletic and should steal plenty of bases, and he also tapped into some power in 2019. It was not a ton of power, and it likely will never be, but he’s got some upside to him that might make him a consistent late round pick in redraft leagues at his peak.

ETA: 2023

 

21. Conner Capel, OF

 

Age: 22

Highest level: AAA

Everything about me was not ready to admit that I saw something in Conner Capel. There are plenty of people who leave him outside of the top 30 ranking. For me the lefty hitter has played better than the grades he’s given each time I’ve seen him. He gets a below average hit tool, but I consistently have seen him square up baseballs. Maybe I’m just catching him in the right games, but the ball jumps off Capel’s bat just enough to keep me intrigued.

ETA: 2022

 

22. Andre Pallante, RHP

 

Age: 21

Highest level: A-

The Cardinals had some good luck with their 2019 draft class early on. Pallante is their 4th rounder and he showed a lot in his draft year. Namely, he threw strikes and didn’t walk a ton of people. He’s not a guy I have seen much of, but Matt Thompson of Prospects Live has, and he thinks that Pallante could be a starter in the majors.

ETA: 2023

 

23. Kodi Whitley, RHP

 

Age: 24

Highest level: AAA

There is a very good chance Kodi Whitley sees time in St. Louis in the coming season. He’s a true reliever who was north of 10 K/9 at all three levels he saw last year, including Memphis. The question is not if he can succeed as a big league bullpen arm, for me the question comes down to role. I think his floor is enough to rank him this high on a fantasy list, but what he does for the team might make him less valuable. It all comes down to what kind of leverage situations he is used in.

ETA: 2020

 

24. Ramón Urías, 2B

 

Age: 25

Highest level: AAA

Ramón Urías got off to a slow start last year, but he does have some offensive upside in his game. His hit tool is slightly above average which is his carrying tool as well. Everything else is slightly below average. So he’ll never be a big contributor from a fantasy aspect, but he might be getting some innings in 2020 at the MLB level.

ETA: 2020

 

25. Malcom Nunez, 3B

 

Age: 18

Highest level: A

Malcom Nunez exploded onto the scene after hitting over .400 in Rookie ball in 2018. The next season was not so kind to him. There were some holes in his swing that pitchers were able to take advantage of. But let’s not get too down on the guy, his upside is still crazy. He’s got the potential to hit for power with an average or better hit tool. He is just so raw at the moment, and that is okay because he will be 19 for all of the 2020 season. He’s young.

ETA: 2024

 

26. Patrick Romeri, OF

 

Age: 18

Highest level: R

Once again, a thank you goes to Matt Thompson at Prospects Live. Without him, Patrick Romeri would probably be well under my radar. That would’ve been criminal. While Romeri is raw, he has some really nice upside in the power department. The report on him is that he can square up a baseball well, which adds more hype to his his potential power.

ETA: 2024

 

27. Delvin Perez, SS

 

Age: 21

Highest level: A

I’m not sure what it is that won’t let me quit believing in Delvin Perez, but there’s something. He’s a glove first shortstop, which doesn’t help fantasy owners much. What will help is his speed. Power will not be a part of his game, but he uses his speed well on both sides of the ball and I think that will add value. The only question is a big one, will he hit? Man, I hope he will.

ETA: 2022

 

28. Pedro Pages, C

 

Age: 21

Highest level: A-

Another guy whose calling card is his defense, but there is something interesting lying in Pedro Pages‘ numbers. He was drafted in 2019 and racked up just over 200 plate appearances. His ISO in that time was .140, but he didn’t hit tons of homers which means he can provide some gap power. He also showed a good understanding of the strike zone with his 13.1 percent walk rate.

ETA: 2023

 

29. Alvaro Seijas, RHP

 

Age: 21

Highest level: A+

The Cardinals protected Alvaro Seijas from the Rule 5 Draft by adding him to the 40-man roster, but there’s still a ways to go for him. He took a step forward in 2019, but he is a destined reliever with a fastball/curveball combo. He could be a solid reliever, or he could never see the light of day, but the Cardinals saw enough in him to protect him and that should say something.

ETA: 2022

 

30. Julio Rodriguez, C

 

Age: 22

Highest level: AA

This is a guy who is higher on a lot of lists. Julio Rodriguez is a defensive ace, but his offense doesn’t carry the same tune. He’s shown some power, and he’s shown some feel to hit, but he’s still got room to grow with the bat. That said, the growth is happening. There’s quite the group of catching hopefuls in the Cardinal farm system, so Rodriguez will have to prove he’s the best among them.

ETA: 2021

 

31. Max Schrock, 2B

 

Age: 25

Highest level: AAA

For the longest time after he was dealt to the Cardinals I was the biggest Max Schrock believer. That sentiment has faded, but I still think he’s potentially worth monitoring. His age is climbing, but his hit tool can still become above average. It seems like his second go round at Triple A in 2019 fared a lot better, so that brings hope he can take another step in 2020.

ETA: 2020

 

32. Seth Elledge, RHP

 

Age: 23

Highest level: AAA

The Cardinals acquired Seth Elledge from the Mariners in 2018. He’s a future reliever, but he could get some decent innings as his slider develops and moves forward. Elledge has the size and frame to turn into a decent bullpen arm, and maybe even sneak his way into the back end. Although to me it seems he may be better suited in a set up role at best with some strikeout upside.

ETA: 2020

 

33. Tommy Parsons, RHP

 

Age: 24

Highest level: AAA

I’m here for the Division III to MLB hype. That is Tommy Parsons. Standing at 6’4″ and coupled with a meteoric rise in 2019, Parsons stock is trending in the right direction. The season saw him pitch at every rung of the ladder from Peoria to Memphis. The bulk of the time came at the AA level, with only five innings at AAA, and he’s done enough to get some following among the Redbird faithful.

ETA: 2021

 

34. Austin Warner, LHP

 

Age: 25

Highest level: AAA

Since the Cardinals signed Austin Warner from the River City Rascals he has done nothing but provide quality innings. He was a quick riser too, going from independent ball in 2017 to AAA in 2018. That’s not a bad couple of years at the office. He’s got one more step to take, and that step is to St. Louis. If he can keep his walks down in 2020, he should be a candidate for some spot start innings.

ETA: 2020

 

35. Justin Toerner, OF

 

Age: 23

Highest level: AA

As a late round pick, it can take a little extra performance to get noticed and move up the ranks. Justin Toerner has done just that. He profiles as a future fourth outfielder, so his fantasy value isn’t as great as his real life value, where I would probably have him in the top 30. He was worth 103 wRC+ in AA last season, and he figures to see AAA in 2020. The Cardinals have a stacked outfield, so his name may get lost, but it shouldn’t.

ETA: 2022

 

36. Leandro Cedeno, OF

 

Age: 21

Highest level: A

There is some big power potential with Leandro Cedeno, but that didn’t show itself in Peoria in 2019. Everything about his swing seems a little deliberate to me, though don’t let that deter from the fact that he is a talented hitter. He’s  a prime candidate to figure it out and have the numbers pop and take a big leap in rankings like this.

ETA: 2024

 

37. Evan Mendoza, 3B

 

Age: 23

Highest level: AAA

There was once a time when Evan Mendoza was the third part of the trio of potential Cardinals third baseman of the future. His spot has since been taken up by Nunez. There is still some upside to Medonza’s hit tool and in his raw power to make him interesting. He struggled a bit in 2019 and didn’t flash any power, which hurts his potential fantasy output.

ETA: 2021

 

38. Steven Gingery, LHP

 

Age: 22

Highest level: R

Frankly, I don’t know much about Steven Gingery. His reports say he can be an innings eater, but injuries have held him to 0.2 innings since being drafted in 2018.

ETA: 2024

 

39. Albert Inoa, 2B

 

Age: 18

Highest level: R

Albert Inoa impressed the eyes of Baseball America‘s writers enough to be named a top 20 DSL player from 2019. They essentially say that a lot of things have to click for him to reach a ceiling, but he walked at a higher percentage than he struck out and I thought that was extremely interesting.

ETA: 2025

 

40. Scott Hurst, OF

 

Age: 23

Highest level: AA

The Cardinals selected Scott Hurst in the third round of the 2017 draft, but he was also the teams’ first pick that year. That puts a little extra pressure on Hurst and he’s still working on putting the pieces together. Despite not performing all too well at the A+ level the Cardinals moved him up to AA where he struggled even more. He’ll hope to get back on track in 2020.

ETA: 2023

 

41. Darlin Moquete, OF

 

Age: 20

Highest level: R

When it gets down to these last 10, sometimes doing some statline scouting pulls some interesting names. I don’t like to stray too far from guys I’ve seen or have trusted eyes vouching for. Darlin Moquete is an example of the former, but what a statline it is. He slashed .390/.459/.571 in the DSL with 23 steals. The icing on the cake is that he posted an 8.8 strikeout percentage and a 9.4 walk percentage. He should be stateside in 2020, so we will see what happens.

ETA: 2024

 

42. Jonatan Machado, OF

 

Age: 21

Highest level: A

It wasn’t too long ago when Jonatan Machado would have a more prominent role on a prospect list, in large part thanks to his plus speed. His bat has just had trouble getting off the ground in his pro career. When it has, his legs haven’t shown up like you would like. He actually hit a respectable .272 in 183 PA in Peoria, but only stole a single base. His potential value will be in learning to use his speed.

ETA: 2024

 

43. Roel Ramirez, RHP

 

Age: 24

Highest level: AAA

Roel Ramirez has three innings at the AAA level and his FIP suggests he was better than his 4.98 ERA. I’m not sure what his role will be in an MLB bullpen, but he was used as a multi innings reliever last year and posting a K/9 just under 10. Fangraphs has him as a top 30 Cardinals prospect for 2020, which adds another level in intrigue for me.

ETA: 2021

 

44. Juan Yepez, 1B

 

Age: 21

Highest level: AA

The above average raw power in Juan Yepez hasn’t quite found it’s way to the game, but it seems to be coming around. He had his first double digit HR year in 2019, hitting a combined 10 across three different levels, posting an above average ISO as well for the first time since the Rookie levels. He’s certainly worth watching to see if the power stroke continues to improve.

ETA: 2022

 

45. Kramer Robertson, 2B

 

Age: 25

Highest level: AAA

Every time I watch Kramer Robertson I’m blown away by his patience at the plate. That isn’t quite a reason to add him to a fantasy team, but it did lead him to be second in walks among all players in the organization in 2019. He also combined for 11 homers and 14 steals across AA and AAA. I’m not sure what role he could play in the MLB since his hit tool isn’t great, but he’s been getting the job done at every level.

ETA: 2021

 

46. Sander Mora, 2B

 

Age: 18

Highest level: R

At this point, I’m looking for standout statistics. Sander Mora fits into the picture as the farm system leader in steals at 33 in 2020. His walk percentage also sat above 15, which led him to a .266/.389/.332 slash line. There’s no power, but some perceived ability to steal bases from someone so young, but if he can keep stealing then he might post some one dimensional value to a fantasy lineup one day.

ETA: 2025

 

47. Lars Nootbar, OF

 

Age: 22

Highest level: AA

Besides having an awesome name, Lars Nootbar has specialized in steadily climbing up the ranks early on in his pro career. He was drafted in 2018 and got up to AA in 2019. What stands out for him is a decent walk rate. He isn’t going to light the world on fire in the power or speed department, but he’s been a solid contributor to each team he’s been assigned to in his career.

ETA: 2024

 

48. Johan Mieses, OF

 

Age: 24

Highest level: AAA

There’s no denying Johan Mieses‘ power, he hit 22 homers across AA and AAA last year and that wasn’t his first trip north of 20 in a season. The size is nice, as you would imagine, but I rank him so low because it seems he’s low in the pecking order of potential outfielders in terms of getting a chance. My view on him may change if the DH finds its way to the National League.

ETA: 2021

 

49. Angel Cuenca, RHP

 

Age: 18

Highest level: R

Angel Cuenca put together 12 solid starts in the DSL in 2019 that ended with him having a 2.00 ERA and 8.57 K/9 across 63 innings. His 3.30 FIP suggests he pitched over his head, but still those are some nice numbers. He could be primed for rising stock in 2020. He’s not worth grabbing yet, but his name just might start gaining traction if he keeps up his solid performance.

ETA: 2024

 

50. Chandler Redmond, INF 

 

Age: 23

Highest level: R

I added and removed Chandler Redmond from this list about a dozen times. He’s a 32nd rounder out of Gardner-Webb and he just killed it in the Appalachian League. He hit 12 homers on his way to being worth 151 wRC+ with a .252 ISO in a 212 plate appearance sample size. He performed too well not to get some sort of recognition here.

ETA: 2023

A big thank you goes to FanGraphs for stats on a lot of these players.

Featured image by Alyssa Buckter (alyssabuckter.com)

Trevor Hooth

Loves watching MiLB and talking about it. Millikin University alum and optimistic Tigers fan.

2 responses to “Dynasty: St. Louis Cardinals’ 2020 Preseason Top 50 Prospects”

  1. Avatar theKraken says:

    On one hand I really appreciate the lack of hyperbole, mechanical analysis and statcast type data but on the other there isn’t much discussion of tools which I think is most important. For example, why is Liberatore a #3? Aside from everyone is a #3 from far enough away. What separates Liberator and Thompson? Are they far apart? I think they are far apart and the ceiling is significantly higher on Liberatore. How is Gorman advanced and raw? I get that going 50 deep means you will end up with shallow analysis, but really why would you even want to go 50 deep? You included a guy with less than 1 IP and no scouting report – I think that means you have gone past the point you need to. I enjoy the work just trying to help you out here.

    If you really believe improvement is eminent for Montero and he will hit than he might be your #1. I am not so sure he will turn it around. That said, I am still on board because if he does then you are talking about a bat first 1B and a potential superstar offensively…. I think it is anything but a lock though. If anything he is a cautionary tale about how far a player should move up a list in year as he really popped up in 2018. Probably also a lesson about levels, youth and experience as well. While he did light up A as a 19 y/o it was his fourth professional season. The most interesting thing about Montero to me is how aggressively STL has pushed him. Sending him to AA and not demoting him was pretty crazy and it didn’t seem to work well. It is easy to imagine that repeating the level and being healthy will solve it all but I don’t know… he was obviously over-matched.

    On Nunez, he did not hit .400 in rookie ball – that was DSL. That is one reason you might not want to use FanGraphs as they just call it (R), but it isn’t. Fangraphs really is not a good place for stats as they obscure the details. They are great for progressive stats, but they are the worst choice for the basics. In other words if you want context adjusted stats then head there, but for everything else go to baseball-reference. The accuracy of those adjusted stats at that low a level are highly questionable but at least it tells you something about the league so it does have some value. DSL stats barely count for anything. It was sub-A, but what I would call rookie is way above DSL. The lesson to learn with Nunez is that those stats mean literally nothing. I still like him as a flier. Those IFAs are not as young developmentally as their US counterparts as they generally played professional baseball or something like minor league baseball in their home countries. A 19 y/o from the US is generally playing their first season of real baseball – no travel and showcase doesn’t count. The same applies to Montero above as he may be young but has had several years of pro instruction. Lots of fantasy draft busts are kind of cut from that mold – more advanced than their peers and they rake up to the point where they no longer eclipse their peers in terms of experience.

    Curious what you mean by Machado would have been higher on lists not long ago. If anything I would say that speed is overvalued in prospect lists more than it used to be. Prospecting hasn’t advanced an inch in the past decade. I think it is has backslid as people are now more concerned with results over process and attempting to gauge baseball ability from drills in many cases. There are now more people convinced that more players will succeed for more reasons – not exactly advancement as much as throwing more darts.

    I enjoyed your work. I just like to rant about prospects. I wish I had more to contribute but not today! Thanks again for the time and effort.

    • Avatar Trevor Hooth says:

      I appreciate you reading through. The decisions for each blurb were more based in how I could explain each guy the easiest, so for some it was tools, others it was mechanics/numbers.
      For Liberatore, he’s given a 3 ceiling by many because his ability to create swing and miss mostly. Still has great size and command. He’s a high level 3 ceiling in my book.
      Gorman is an advanced hitter for his age, but his tools aren’t polished.
      Gingery is where he because injuries have held him back, but the Cardinals drafted him knowing of his first injury, he can still turn into a starter, and since this is a fantasy-focused list that deserves a nod, in my opinion.
      I’m not sure Montero will ever be #1, but he is a good hitter. With him I believe it was more injuries than being overmatched, even for his age. His defense will likely make him move to be a 1B when it’s all said and done.
      For Nunez, DSL is still a form of Rookie ball, it’s called that level on the MiLB page too, but maybe I should’ve specified. Either way, the drop off was there and he will hopefully turn it around in 2019..I imagine back with JC, but maybe Peoria if the team wants to be aggressive.
      I say higher because Machado made some top 30 lists a couple years ago, that’s all.

      I hope some of this was helpful, thank you for the kind words and for reading!

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