Dynasty: Milwaukee Brewers’ 2020 Preseason Top 50 Prospects

Andy Patton ranks the Top 50 prospects in the Milwaukee Brewers farm system for dynasty formats.

The Milwaukee Brewers have mortgaged a lot of their future in order to try to keep pace in the crowded NL Central, which has resulted in one of the worst farm systems in the major leagues. The graduation of Keston Hiura didn’t help, nor did the step back from many of their top prospects in recent years.

Despite the pessimism, this system still has a handful of players who could contribute in dynasty formats in the short and long term. As well as some recent J-2 signings who are already looking promising and could help replenish this system.

Note: These Top 50 lists are all done through a fantasy baseball-focused lens. Many players who are ranked higher or lower on other platforms will get a boost here. For example, players who profile as middle relievers or glove-first infielders likely won’t have much fantasy relevance, so they won’t be ranked as highly. 

 

1. Brice Turang, SS

 

Age: 20

Highest level: A+

Turang is a poor man’s Nick Madrigal, a good fielding middle infield prospect who has the OBP skills and speed to be a top of the order table-setter. At Single-A Wisconsin last season, Turang posted a .384 OBP with 21 steals in 82 games with nearly as many walks (49) as strikeouts (54).

He didn’t have as much success at High-A, but at age 20 he was among the youngest players at that level, so we’ll give him a pass.

Turang likely won’t hit for much power, but a true shortstop with 25+ stolen bases and a .285/.385 BA/OBP seems well within reason and makes him a fringe top-100 prospect and a strong dynasty asset.

ETA: Late 2021

 

2. Tristen Lutz, OF

 

Age: 21

Highest Level: A+

You’ll notice a theme as we go down this list, as the Brewers have long prioritized power-over-hit with their outfielders. As such, the farm system is littered with exciting, toolsy power/speed outfield prospects who are hampered by huge strikeout issues. It’s a system full of Keon Broxton‘s with the hope that 1-2 of them will blossom into a George Springer.

The best chance of that happening is with Lutz, the 34th overall pick of the 2017 draft who hit .255/.335/.419 with 13 home runs in 112 games with High-A last year.

Lutz is just 21 and is expected to add even more power as he matures. He has a line-drive stroke and uses all fields well, a sign he could actually buck the trend and develop into a well-rounded hitter.

Along with decent speed, Lutz has the potential to be a five-tool contributor in the future—although that 28.7% strikeout rate in High-A is hard to ignore.

ETA: Late 2021

 

3. Ethan Small, LHP

 

Age: 22

Highest Level: A

I want to be more excited about Ethan Small, Milwaukee’s first-round pick in 2018, but his sudden velocity drop after Tommy John surgery and his pretty “blah” secondaries have me thinking that his floor and ceiling are nearly identical.

However, that’s not always a bad thing in dynasty formats. Small will almost certainly be a big-league starter, probably settling into a mid-rotation spot, with the likely floor being a No. 5 starter.

He could surprise people and move up with some improvements to his command and his secondary offerings. Ultimately, Small is a safe pick in dynasty drafts if you just need someone who will contribute to a big league rotation in the next few years, with limited risk.

ETA: 2022

 

4. Corey Ray, OF

 

Age: 25

Highest Level: AAA

Ray appeared to finally breakthrough in 2018 with an absolutely monstrous performance at AA, blasting 27 home runs and swiping 37 bases with a respectable but underwhelming .239/.323/.477 slash line.

Another toolsy strikeout machine, Ray regressed considerably in 2019, hitting an abysmal .188/.261/.329 with seven home runs and three steals in 230 plate appearances at Triple-A. A wrist injury may have had something to do with that, however, and Ray still has the potential to be a 20/30 bat in the big leagues, which could happen as soon as 2020.

The Broxton-Springer range of outcomes is very present here, making him a high-risk, high-reward dynasty asset.

ETA: 2020

 

5. Antoine Kelly, LHP

 

Age: 20

Highest Level: A

Kelly was Milwaukee’s second pick in the 2019 draft, and the flame-throwing left-hander has already drawn comparisons to David Pricewhich should turn some heads.

Kelly’s fastball has the makings of elite status, coming in at 98 mph with movement. At 6’6″ and 205 pounds, some added muscle should allow him to sit in the mid-to-high 90s for multiple innings at a time, an extremely appealing trait.

His secondaries are lacking, not entirely surprising for a 20-year-old who only threw one season in junior college, but he’ll need to prove he can land his slider for strikes and develop a changeup if he wants to reach his ceiling as a high-strikeout starter.

Otherwise, his profile doesn’t resemble Price but instead resembles current Brewers pitcher Josh Hader.

For dynasty purposes, owners will hope for the former—but the latter isn’t a horrible consolation prize either.

ETA: 2022

 

6. Drew Rasmussen, RHP

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: AA

I’m almost certainly the high man on right-hander Drew Rasmussen, but it’s hard not to love the combination of stuff and results we have seen out of him so far.

Rasmussen was a stud at baseball powerhouse Oregon State, but a pair of Tommy John surgeries hampered his college career. Milwaukee liked him enough to snatch him in the sixth round in 2018, and he made his pro debut in 2019—throwing 74 innings and posting a 3.15 ERA, 1.18 WHIP and an excellent 96/31 K/BB ratio.

Rasmussen throws hard, with a riding fastball in the upper 90’s and a slider that sits 88-91. His changeup has rapidly developed into a plus-pitch as well, giving me hope he could be a front-line or at least mid-rotation starter. Command is an issue—along with health (which is the biggest concern), but I love the upside enough to gamble pretty highly on Rasmussen and believe he could be the best big-league pitcher in this system when all is said and done.

ETA: 2021

 

7. Eduardo Garcia, SS

 

Age: 17

Highest Level: R

Ranking prospects by their system is a challenge, primarily because a dynasty team’s direction and contention window impact how you value prospects. For example, Small is a safe, albeit boring, dynasty asset who should reach his floor in a year or so, but likely doesn’t have much upside.

Garcia is the exact opposite: a 17-year-old shortstop prospect who has tantalizing tools but has only played 10 professional games, and could just as easily flame out and never reach the big leagues.

Garcia hit .313 in rookie ball but is known more for his glovework than his bat. The power is not expected to develop into anything more than a 10-12 HR annually type guy, but his bat control and speed could make him fantasy relevant elsewhere, and the glove projects him as a potential everyday shortstop.

Take Small if you want a safe pick, but for those who like to gamble or are embarking on deep rebuilds, Garcia is one to keep an eye on.

ETA: 2024

 

8. Mario Feliciano, C

 

Age: 21

Highest Level: AA

The Brewers system is loaded with two things: strikeout-prone, toolsy outfielders and catchers. Milwaukee may have the worst farm in the MLB, but they have a legitimate argument for a top-five system based on catchers.

The best of the bunch is Feliciano, a 21-year-old who overcame an injury-prone 2018 season to blast 19 home runs with a .273/.324/.477 in 116 games at High-A last year.

His 6.0% walk rate and 28.8% strikeout rate are concerning, but his raw power is very real and his athleticism behind the plate is enough that he should reach his potential as a bat-first starting-caliber catcher, possibly as soon as 2021.

ETA: 2021

 

9. Aaron Ashby, LHP

 

Age: 21

Highest Level: A+

The Brewers have a handful of sneaky good pitching prospects. Ashby came to Milwaukee as a relatively unheralded fourth-round pick in 2018, making seven solid starts down the stretch in A-ball.

He improved on that in 2019, posting a 3.54 ERA and an 11.80 K/9 in 61 innings, before getting called up to High-A where he had similar success preventing runs (3.46 ERA) but a diminished strikeout rate (7.62 K/9).

Ashby’s fastball is up into the low-90’s now, and his curveball is among the best in the minor leagues, with a true 65-grade from MLB Pipeline. Add in the fact that his changeup showed improvement last year and he has all the tools to be a No. 2/3 rotation piece.

His command is the big concern here, as his 4.3 BB/9 indicates, but if he can refine his location he should be a very solid fantasy asset in the not-too-distant future.

ETA: Late 2021

 

10. Luis Medina, OF

 

Age: 16

Highest Level: N/A

This Milwaukee system is bad, to put it lightly, so at this point, I’d rather take gambles on much riskier players, as they have a far greater ceiling than many of the utility infielder/fourth outfielder types to follow.

Medina represents the most palatable high-risk hitter in this system. The 13th ranked international prospect in the 2019 signing period, he inked a $1.3M deal with Milwaukee in July. Standing 6’2″ with tremendous raw power, Medina’s profile is hard to gauge otherwise—hence the risk.

However, potential plus-plus power in a 16-year-old who still has some filling out to do is no doubt extremely exciting, and Medina is perhaps the highest ceiling prospect in this entire system.

ETA: 2024

 

11. Thomas Dillard, 1B

 

Age: 22

Highest Level: A

Dillard is one of my favorite prospects in this system. The Brewers have no idea where he’s going to play, but guess what? That doesn’t matter in fantasy baseball. Dillard caught in high school but has played mostly first base and left field in his brief professional career, and honestly probably profiles best as a DH—which is why he isn’t featured as highly on other rankings.

However, he has tremendous bat speed and very, very projectable raw power, with comparisons to Kyle Schwarber being tossed around. Beyond that, he has an absolutely elite eye at the plate, walking a staggering 19.9% of the time in 51 games at Single-A last year.

Dillard has the tools to be a 25+ home run threat with OBP’s in the .380s—numbers that will play at any position on the field, and look darn good in your UTIL spot on dynasty teams.

ETA: 2022

 

12. Eduarqui Fernandez, OF

 

Age: 18

Highest Level: R

Fernandez is basically the 2018 version of Medina, signed a year earlier out of the DR thanks to his raw power projection.

His first professional season showed that the power is clearly real, as he hit 11 home runs in 72 games. However, he only managed a .214/.301/.372 slash line with a frightening 32.5% strikeout rate.

Fernandez has speed as well, swiping 15 bases, which gives him some serious potential as a 20/20 type threat. However, he’ll need to work on his contact skills and patience at the plate in order to reach that ceiling.

At age 18, there’s still plenty of time for him to right the ship.

ETA: 2023

 

13. Trey Supak, RHP

 

Age: 23

Highest Level: AAA

Trey Supak is an incredibly boring prospect. For all I know, he could be a super interesting person (in case he reads this), but there’s not a ton to love about his profile, but not much to dislike either.

His calling card is his size, a burly 6’5″ and 240 pounds which gives him a solid frame to be a durable, innings-eater type back of the rotation arm. He has put together two consecutive successful campaigns in AA, although he struggled mightily in seven starts at AAA last year.

Supak has a low-90s fastball that has ticked up a bit in recent years, as well as a pair of average secondaries in his slider and changeup. He pounds the bottom of the zone well and has command of all three pitches, with a fringy curveball to boot.

It’s hard to imagine him developing into more than a No. 4/5 starter, but that’s a ceiling he’s not all that far away from. His mediocre stuff likely won’t lead to many strikeouts, which unfortunately doesn’t build a strong fantasy profile. He should get a shot in the big leagues in 2020.

ETA: 2020

 

14. Carlos Rodriguez, OF

 

Age: 19

Highest Level: R

The Brewers haven’t had a ton of luck drafting and developing players lately, but they have heavily invested in the J-2 market. Rodriguez was another pickup in the 2017-18 class, signed for $1.3 million.

He is known more for his glove than his bat, a glove that should allow him to play an above-average center field in the future. Whether he will hit enough is the question, although his .327 batting average through 104 professional games is extremely promising, along with his sub-10% strikeout rate.

What’s not great is his 13 career walks and 24 total extra-base hits. Rodriguez will need to learn how to take a walk, while growing into some legit pop, or else he runs the risk of being a defense-first fourth outfielder with little fantasy relevance.

ETA: 2023

 

15. Payton Henry, C

 

Age: 22

Highest Level: A+

I objectively know this farm system isn’t very good, but maybe because I’ve been writing about them for a few years now I’ve developed a love for a handful of their guys. That includes catcher Payton Henry, a guy who has steadily risen through the system while improving every stop of the way.

That culminated in a nice showing at High-A last season, where he slashed .242/.315/.395 with 14 home runs and 75 RBI. Mix in his high marks for arm strength and pitch framing, and you have a potential high power starting catcher, a tantalizing premise.

Of course, he wouldn’t be down at 15 if there weren’t concerns, which is where his 5.4% walk rate and 29.5% strikeout rate come in. You can stomach a catcher with a bad batting average if he provides power and plays most days—which is still within the realm of possibilities for Henry, but you’d like to see those numbers improve in the lower levels before you count him as a top prospect.

ETA: 2022

 

16. Zack Brown, RHP

 

Age: 25

Highest Level: AAA

Brown is the biggest faller on this list for me. The 2016 fifth-round pick excelled in the minors, breaking out in a big way in 2018 with a 2.44 ERA, 1.04 WHIP and a 23.1% strikeout rate at AA across 22 appearances—enough for him to be crowned the Southern League’s Most Outstanding Pitcher.

Things went very south in 2019 however, as home runs and a sudden lack of command (11.9% walk rate) lead him to a ghastly 5.79 ERA in AAA, with a 5.67 FIP and a 5.59 xFIP to back up his unsightly numbers.

Brown has the makings of a mid-rotation starter, with a mid-90s fastball that he carries late into starts and a plus curveball, along with a good feel for his changeup. However, his command has been up-and-down, and he relies too often on a dreaded sinker which has proven to be susceptible to the long ball, as evidenced by last year’s numbers.

The floor is too risky for me to have him among Milwaukee’s top 10, a spot he resided for the past few years, but the ceiling is still intact. He could get some starts this season if things go better down in the minors.

ETA: 2020

 

17. Ernesto Martinez, 1B

 

Age: 20

Highest Level: R

Standing 6’6″ and weighing in at an incredibly built 229 pounds, Martinez is “built like a Greek God,” according to Fangraphs. That hasn’t helped him much on the field however, as his 70-grade raw power has only resulted in nine home runs in 132 games across four levels of rookie ball.

Six of those dingers came in 48 games last year, along with a .262/.356/.445 slash line and four steals, but he needs to prove he can stay healthy, improve his game power, and limit his strikeouts (28.7%) if he wants to reach his potential as a legitimate home-run threat. That’s a tall order, but at age 20, there’s still time.

ETA: 2023

 

18. Tyrone Taylor, OF

 

Age: 26

Highest Level: MLB

Taylor finally reached the big leagues last year, a long time coming for the 2012 second-round pick. Long lauded for his athleticism, bat control and speed on the bases, Taylor found his power with a revamped swing in 2018, leading to a 20-home-run, 13-steal season in AA.

He regressed a bit last year, but still managed 14 home runs in 92 games at Triple-A, and hit .400 in his 15-game cameo with Milwaukee.

Taylor looks like a prototypical fourth outfielder, but his tools and recent power surge make him someone worth keeping an eye on, as regular at-bats could make him a fantasy darling.

ETA: 2020

 

19. Joe Gray, OF

 

Age: 19

Highest Level: R

Another toolsy, high-strikeout outfield prospect who struggled at the plate last year, Gray is known for his cannon arm and ridiculous raw power, two qualities that are Vladimir Guerrero-esque.

His tendency to swing at everything is Vlad-like as well, but he has a long, long way to go in the contact department in order to even be an average big league regular. The tools are there, but I need to see more before I’m buying in.

ETA: 2024

 

20. Hedbert Perez, OF

 

Age: 16

Highest Level: N/A

He’s a long, long way away from being relevant in most fantasy formats, but in your super deep dynasty league, he might be worth stashing and seeing what happens.

ETA: 2025

21. Je’Von Ward, OF

 

Age: 20

Highest Level: A

Most expected Ward to turn down his 12th round selection in favor of a scholarship to USC in 2017, as he was viewed as far too raw to be ready for minor league action. Ward instead signed for much more than his slot value and has looked, well, raw in his first few minor league seasons.

The hard contact and size give him a tantalizing power profile, but a near 70% ground-ball rate has resulted in just four professional home runs, and while his plate discipline is solid he needs to prove he can lift the ball in order to move up on this list, which he could do in a hurry.

ETA: 2022

 

22. Alec Bettinger, RHP

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: AA

Bettinger merits a high spot on this list thanks to a statistically excellent 2019 season, but his stuff likely caps him with a ceiling of a back end starter. Still, his 26.7% strikeout and 6.0% walk ratio in 2019, along with a 3.44 ERA (3.13 FIP) and a 1.07 WHIP.

I’m not investing too much here, but he might not be too far away from starting big league games, which is something.

ETA: Late 2020

 

23. Micah Bello, OF

 

Age: 19

Highest Level: R

Bello is another one of the prospects in this system that I have a small crush on. A speedy center fielder who could steal 20+ bases with full-time work in the show, Bello showed a glimpse of power last season, with his ISO going from .084 to .186 in his second go-round of rookie ball.

He looks the part of a high-OBP, top-of-the-order table-setter, but he needs to make more contact and maintain some power growth in order to avoid being a pinch-runner/bench bat at the next level.

ETA: 2024

 

24. Luis Castro, 1B

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: AA

Castro spent the last six seasons piddling away in Colorado’s farm system, posting good averages but little else before exploding last year at High-A Lancaster, where he blasted 25 home runs with 14 steals and a cartoonish .317/.425/.584 slash line.

Lancaster is a ballpark known as the launching pad for gaudy hitting numbers, and a 24-year-old in High-A is expected to mash, but numbers like that merit at least some attention. Defensively limited, Castro is likely utility depth, with a ceiling as a platoon bat—something he could reach as soon as 2020.

ETA: Late 2020

 

25. Felix Valerio, 2B

 

Age: 19

Highest Level: R

Valerio was the third piece in the Keon Broxton trade last January but finds himself first on this list after Adam Hill was traded to Seattle and Bobby Wahl got bumped thanks to injuries. Valerio has hit for a high average in each of the last two years in the DSL, but at 5’7″ and 165 pounds, it’s hard to imagine him as a big-league regular.

Valerio also has no power to speak of (three home runs in 108 games) and looks more like a utility infielder than anything. Still, the high averages and lack of strikeouts are interesting.

ETA: 2024

 

26. Weston Wilson, 1B/2B/3B/OF

 

Age: 25

Highest Level: AA

Wilson is a 25-year-old who spent all of 2019 in AA, which partly explains his 19 home runs, 12 steals, and 116 wRC+. He has power and speed and can play everywhere on the diamond except catcher and shortstop, which makes him a prime candidate to be a toolsy utility infielder. They rarely have much fantasy value, but in deeper leagues, he could have some.

ETA: 2021

 

27. Nick Bennett, RHP

 

Age: 20

Highest Level: A-

Bennett’s stocked dropped after a disappointing junior year at Louisville, but the Brewers believe they may have gotten a steal in the sixth round last June. Bennett did post 43 strikeouts in 33 pro innings split between rookie-ball and single-A, but he still has a ways to go to prove himself as a potential back-end rotation piece or potentially a bullpen weapon.

ETA: 2022

 

28. Nick Kahle, C

 

Age: 21

Highest Level: A+

Kahle was a fourth-round pick by the Brewers in 2019, playing most of his first season in rookie-ball but drawing a two-game cameo in High-A. He is a glove-first receiver who most scouts believe can hit for average in the big leagues, a rarity behind the plate, but whose slight frame doesn’t lend itself to much power potential.

As such, he has the ceiling of an average starter, with a long career as a backup the likely floor.

ETA: 2022

 

29. Devin Williams, RHP

 

Age: 25

Highest Level: MLB

If you’ve read my other lists you know I tend to devalue pure relief pitcher prospects, as the odds of them having fantasy relevancy in most formats is slim. That’s all true of Williams, but his raw strikeout potential (82 in 57 MiLB innings in 2019) gives him a slightly higher ceiling.

He probably won’t be closing games anytime soon, but his plus fastball and changeup combo make him a potential bullpen weapon, and one to keep an eye on in formats that count holds and/or K/9.

ETA: 2020

 

30. Mark Mathias, 2B/3B

 

Age: 25

Highest Level: AAA

Mathias has all the makings of a toolsy utility infielder, having played second, short, and third in AAA with the Indians last year, while belting 12 home runs with 13 steals and a .269/.355/.442 slash line.

He makes good contact and has solid plate discipline, but his fantasy value will be limited unless he somehow plays himself into an everyday role, which will be tough to do in Milwaukee. He should make his debut in 2020.

ETA: 2020

31. David Fry, C

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: A

Fry is another strong catcher prospect in a system full of them. As a 23-year-old in single-A, Fry expectedly raked, bashing 41 doubles and 17 home runs with a tidy .258/.329/.444 slash line.

He went down to Arizona and was an AFL All-Star, so his stock is squarely on the rise.

ETA: 2021

 

32. Lucas Erceg, 3B

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: AAA

Erceg has long been one of Milwaukee’s top prospects, but his bat just hasn’t shown enough promise for him to take that next step. He has serious raw power, blasting 15 home runs in 116 games with Triple-A last year, but his .218 batting average was last in the PCL, and his 25.1% strikeout rate is an issue.

At this point, he looks like a platoon 1B/3B at his ceiling, and while the power is tantalizing, the risk is too high for me to invest much. He should get his first taste of big-league action in 2020.

ETA: 2020

 

33. Justin Jarvis, RHP

 

Age: 19

Highest Level: A

Jarvis had a nice year in Single-A in 2019 as a 19-year-old, posting a 3.50 ERA and a 1.18 WHIP in 74.2 innings across 11 starts. However, his 16.9% strikeout rate and 11.7% walk rate are discouraging. While he does have a plus fastball, he also carries a hefty amount of relief risk, and probably won’t strike out enough guys even if he does make it as a starter.

ETA: 2024

 

34. Pablo Abreu, OF

 

Age: 20

Highest Level: A

Abreu has the size, speed, and power to be a potential five-tool contributor down the line, but a lost 2019 season has his floor bottoming out, making me concerned he won’t reach that lofty ceiling. If he can get the strikeouts under control, he’ll rise back up this list in a hurry.

ETA: 2023

 

35. Chad Spanberger, 1B/OF

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: AA

Spanberger was a sixth-rounder in 2016 who is already on his third franchise after coming from Toronto to Milwaukee in the Chase Anderson trade. Although his numbers dipped away from the hitter-friendly confines of Asheville in 2018, Spanberger still managed to mash 13 home runs with a respectable 108 wRC+ and four steals in AA last year.

He has the makings of a platoon bat with serious pop and could challenge for a big-league role in 2020.

ETA: 2021

 

36. Joantgel Segovia, OF

 

Age: 23

Highest Level: AA

Segovia posted career highs in home runs (7) and stolen bases (15) last year, split between High-A and Double-A. A toolsy outfielder with very low strikeout rates, Segovia is looking more and more the part of a fourth outfielder—although the ceiling is fairly low.

ETA: 2021

 

37. Phil Bickford, RHP

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: A+

Hello old friend. Bickford is one of the more fascinating minor leaguers around, having been drafted twice, traded once, suspended once, injured a crapload, and finally moved to the bullpen. Despite all this, Bickford is still just 24 years old and is coming off a strong 2019 season at High-A, where he posted a 2.48 ERA (2.03 FIP) with a 1.04 WHIP and a 41.1%(!) strikeout rate.

The 32.2 inning sample isn’t great, but considering his previous pedigree, there is definitely potential for a dominant reliever here, and one I’m considering re-adding to my dynasty teams.

ETA: 2021

 

38. Korry Howell, UTIL

 

Age: 21

Highest Level: A

Howell was a 12th round pick in 2018 and has displayed outstanding speed and defensive versatility in his professional career, playing both the infield and outfield while swiping 31 bases in 119 games over the past two seasons.

It’s unclear if the hit tool will ever be enough for him to make it, but he could be a speed-first utility player in the show.

ETA: 2022

 

39. Arbert Cipion, OF

 

Age: 19

Highest Level: R

Cipion was a 9th-rounder in 2018, but the Brewers paid him enough to lure him out of high school, and he swiped 22 bases in 47 games at rookie ball with a respectable .243/.351/.429 slash line. He has very little power to speak of, but he’s not a terrible speed-only dart throw in dynasty.

ETA: 2024

40. Braden Webb, RHP

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: AA

Webb is a big right-hander with a plus fastball and curveball, and a solid changeup to boot. He has very little command and control however and seems like a near-lock to transition to the bullpen this year.

He has the tools to be a decent middle reliever, and possibly even a late-inning option if he can get the walks under control.

ETA: 2023

 

41. Jacob Nottingham, C

 

Age: 24

Highest Level: MLB

It feels like forever ago that Nottingham was a top-100 prospect (No. 66 by Baseball Prospectus in 2016), but the power-hitting catcher still cracks this list, despite limited improvements with the stick and strikeout concerns.

He has a .355 OBP in 31 MLB plate appearances and has flashed enough power at AAA to merit consideration as an offense-first backup catcher in the show, making him worth a look in deep dynasty formats and NL-only formats that—for some reason —carry two catchers.

ETA: 2020

 

42. J.P. Feyereisen, RHP

 

Age: 26

Highest Level: AAA

Feyereisen came to Milwaukee as a minor league free agent after spending the last four years with the Yankees. He’s a pure reliever with some command issues, but his strikeout numbers are gaudy and the Brewers tend to maximize the skill sets of guys like this, so maybe there’s something here. He could be on the roster come Opening Day if he does well in spring training.

ETA: 2020

 

43. C.J. Hinojosa, INF

 

Age: 25

Highest Level: AA

Hinojosa has spent parts of the last four seasons at AA, but has yet to reach AAA or the big leagues. While he’s hit well (.280 last year in 120 games) he doesn’t have enough power or speed (eight homers, three steals) to make much of an impact on your fantasy team, even if he realizes his potential as a utility infielder.

ETA: Late 2020

 

44. Branlyn Jaraba, 3B

 

Age: 17

Highest Level: R

Jaraba was another J-2 signing last year, and the 17-year-old posted quietly solid numbers in rookie-ball, hitting .247/.325/.352 with four home runs and five steals in 69 games. He struck out 26.8% of the time, which is concerning, but if he grows into his 6’2″ frame he could have legit pop.

ETA: 2025

 

45. Bowden Francis, RHP

 

Age: 23

Highest Level: AA

Francis has not been talked about as a legitimate prospect much, but his numbers last year are worthy of a spot on this list after he posted a 3.99 ERA, 1.24 WHIP and a very solid 26.7% strikeout rate in AA across 24 starts. He is probably a long reliever/spot starter type, with middle relief an option as well depending on how his secondaries shape up.

ETA: 2021

 

46. Caden Lemons, RHP

 

Age: 21

Highest Level: R

Injuries have limited Lemons to just 34.2 innings pitched professionally, zero in 2019. The 2017 second-round pick has a plus fastball and an average slider, and while the Brewers were hoping to see him make it as a starter, his injury history and lack of changeup development likely have him ticketed for relief, a role he could excel at if he can stay healthy.

ETA: 2022

 

47. Dylan File, RHP

 

Age: 23

Highest Level: AA

File posted an absolutely eye-popping 133:22 strikeout-to-walk ratio between High-A and Double-A last year, putting him on this list, but a low-90s fastball and fringey secondaries likely paint him as a sixth starter/long relief prospect, albeit one with some strikeout potential.

ETA: 2021

 

48. Yeison Coca, 2B/SS

 

Age: 20

Highest Level: A

Coca has shown excellent speed and glove work in the minors the past few years, and his massive improvements in plate discipline (a five-percent increase in walk rate) is a nice touch, but he has almost no power and his contact rate has plummeted, with a measly .203 average in Single-A last year.

He looks the part of a future utility infielder with some speed, but the bat has some catching up to do.

ETA: 2023

 

 

49. Larry Ernesto, OF

 

Age: 19

Highest Level: R

Ernesto is a switch-hitter who has been christened with 55-grade raw power, which is why other outlets have him in the top 25 of this system, but his egregious strikeout issues and swing at everything mentality concern me. He struck out 44.7% of the time in rookie ball last year and has just seven home runs in 80 minor league games.

If that power starts to make its way into games, maybe he’ll make his way toward the top 30.

ETA: 2024

 

50. Max Lazar, RHP

 

Age: 20

Highest Level: A

Lazar had a 109/15 strikeout-to-walk ratio along with a 2.39 ERA and a 1.04 WHIP as a 20-year-old in Single-A last year, numbers that should put him on the radar. His fastball barely reaches 90 though, and while the command is good and the room for growth (6’3″, 165 pounds) is there, he’ll need to improve those secondaries to make it as anything more than an org. guy.

ETA: 2022

 

Others given consideration: RHP Alexis Ramirez, RHP Eric Yardley, RHP Bobby Wahl, 1B Chad McClanahan, RHP Jesus Castillo, C David Freitas

Photo by David Kirouac/Icon Sportswire | Adapted by Michael Packard (@designsbypack on Twitter and Instagram)

Andy Patton

Andy is the Dynasty Manager here at PitcherList. He manages all of the prospect content on the site, while also contributing a weekly article on Deep League Adds and dynasty deep sleepers. Beat writer for the Seattle Seahawks (SeahawksWire) as well as the host of the Score Zags Score Podcast.

  • Hedbert has easily the highest upside (IMO) within the entire farm system. Thanks for the writeup!

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