Glossary


Serious Definitions

BABIP: Batting Average of Balls In Play. Grants a hitter or pitcher (technically, BABIP allowed for pitchers) a batting average based on all batted balls, not including HRs. A grossly high number can indicate an unlucky pitcher/lucky hitter, and a low number can indicate a lucky pitcher/unlucky hitter. Line Drive Percentage, Ballpark Factor, and Team Defense can all be variables to explain a given BABIP outside of the luck factor.

BB%: Walk percentage. The ratio of walks per plate appearances for batters, the ratio of walks allowed per batters faced for pitchers.

BB/9: Walks per nine innings. Also known as BB per 9. An elite rate is 2.25 or lower, a poor rate is 3 or higher.

FIP: Fielding Independent Pitching. An Earned Run metric that grants an expected run total over 9 innings given league average batted balls. In other words, it removes the luck factor of batted balls and attributes them equally to determine a pitcher’s expected ERA.

HR/FB: Home Runs allowed per Fly Ball for pitchers, Home Runs hit per Fly Ball for hitters.

ISO: Isolated Power. ISO is calculated by subtracting a batter’s slugging percentage from their batting average (SLG – AVG). ISO indicates the percentage of extra bases (2B, 3B, HRs) per hit. The greater the ISO, the greater the total bases per batter’s hit.

K%: Strikeout percentage. The ratio of strikeouts per plate appearances for batters, the ratio of strikeouts per batters faced for pitchers.

K/9: Strikeouts per nine innings. Also known as K per 9. An elite rate is 9 per 9, a sub-par is 7 or lower.

LOB%: Left On Base percentage. Calculates the how often a pitcher prevents base-runners from scoring a run. Often considered a luck stat in which the pitcher has little effect on its number. High LOB% = lucky pitcher, low LOB% = unlucky pitcher. League average normally sits around 71.0%

Runs Above Average: An accumulative stat that dictates how effective a pitch is based on how frequently it is used and its outcome. The effectiveness is compared to the league average, creating a +/- difference. Given its accumulative nature, many pitchers can have a large + number for high quality pitches, while others may have a large – number for frequently ineffective pitches.

Streamer: Pitchers who are added just for a single start based on a good matchup and are quickly dropped thereafter.

OBP: On-base percentage. Adds batting average plus walk percentage plus hit-by-pitch percentage. (AVG + BB% + HBP%)

OPS: On-base percentage + slugging percentage. (OBP + SLG)

Thrown %: The percentage of which a pitcher throws a specific pitch.

Volatility %: How often a pitcher performs in the extremes of either ERA or Strikeouts/WHIP (VPR or VPRs). Also known as V-rate. Read about it here.

VPR: Volatility Performance Ratio. A metric unique to Pitcher List that analyzes how often a starting pitcher throws a game with either an excellent ERA, average ERA, or poor ERA. Read about it here.

VPRs: Volatility Performance Ratio strikeouts. Just like VPR but measures Strikeouts and WHIP instead of ERA. Read about it here.

WAR: Wins Above Replacement. An accumulative metric that takes variables from offensive ability, speed, and defensive ability, and deduces how many Wins that player earns for their team above the league’s average player at that position.

Whiff Rate: How often a pitch induces a swinging strike from a batter.

xFIP: The same as FIP, but changes their HR/FB% number to league average (~10%). Pitchers with a lower xFIP than FIP had an above average HR/FB%, while pitchers with a higher xFIP than FIP had a below average HR/FB%.

Not-So-Serious Definitions

Blame it on the ____: When a pitcher does better than they normally should because they were pitching against a horrible offense, such as the Padres, Rays, or Braves.

Blegh: When a guy is below average but not horrendous. Pitching lines that make you feel uncomfortable looking at them.

Call Boy: The pitcher Nick picked as that day’s streamer. “Secondary Call Boy” refers to a worthwhile choice but not the first option for the stream. “Reluctant Call Boy” was the Call Boy of the day, but only due to a lack of options and was not recommend to actually stream in normal circumstances.

Cherry Bomb: A term given to a pitcher who could give an excellent performance or a complete dud. In other words, be really sweet (cherry) or blow up in your face (bomb).

Cup of Schmo: A fantasy irrelevant rookie pitcher who comes up for a spot start and will quickly be sent down to the minors thereafter. Can also refer to a rookie pitcher who has a spot in a big league rotation, but isn’t a household name because he isn’t good enough to be on a fantasy roster.

DLH: Stands for Disabled List Hangover. Nick has a theory that you shouldn’t start pitchers for their first start back from a DL stint, especially an extended one.

Doing the Dougie: When a pitcher has a solid WHIP and allows 0 ER but strikes out one or fewer batters (in honor of Doug Fister).

Don’t trust a knuckleballer: Nick’s way of saying that Knuckleballers are unpredictable and can’t be depended on to be a productive member of your roster.

Dusty Donut: When a pitcher has an excellent strikeout total and great WHIP or ERA, but it comes with either a poor ERA or poor WHIP. You want to enjoy the sweet K total and ERA or WHIP, but you feel dirty for liking it.

Dutch Invasion: A term for Derek Holland‘s collapse from being a decent streamer to a poor fantasy option.

GQSB: Geezer Quality Start Battle. It’s a battle between Bartolo Colon, Mark Buehrle, Aaron Harang, and Tim Hudson to see who can through the most consecutive Quality Starts to begin the season.

LoKer TOCAL: Lohse v. Kershaw ER Tournament of Champions and Lohse. It’s a year long contest to see which is higher: Clayton Kershaw starts with 2 ER or fewer or Kyle Lohse starts with 3 ER or more.

Loose Lips: Jeff Samardzija‘s nickname. Derived from his actual nickname of “Shark”. Shark –> Jaws –> Samardzija is ineffective and sink ships –> Loose Lips.

Minimalist Score: The total amount of stats accumulated by a pitcher who threw at least eight innings. The 2015 winner was Alfredo Simon, who on April 15th had a line of 8.0 IP, 0 ER, 2 Hits, 0 BBs, 2 Ks, earning a MS of 4.  The winner of 2016 was Jeff Locke who earned an MS Score of 4 on May 30th in a CGSHO.

MFRTSPA: Most Fantasy Relevant Twins Starting Pitcher Award. Phil Hughes won in 2014, Trevor May in 2015, and Jose Berrios looks to have it locked down in 2016.

NL Easy: Another way of saying NL East, emphasizing the division’s poor offensive teams.

One Night Bland: When a normally poor pitcher has himself a great night out of the blue.

Panda: A pitcher who is Waiver Wire Fodder –> WWF –> Panda. Also makes the joke that the player is like Pablo Sandoval who used to be rosterable but is now worthless to your team.

PEAS: Stands for Poor Execution, Awesome Stuff.  It’s given to a few players who are incredibly tantalizing, but ultimately rarely express their upside and are more headaches than guys you actually want to roster. Prime example is Carlos Rodon. Similar to a Cherry Bomb, but these players have more obvious upside despite not expressing it less often.

Plague of the 19: Nick’s way of referring to how pretty much everyone inside the “Definitive Top 19” tier of the 2016 pre-season was a disappointment one way or another.

Singled Out: When a pitcher gives a lot of runs due to a really high BABIP as opposed to giving up the longball.

Sir W. : Williams Perez‘s nickname. Instead of a first name and a last name, Perez has two last names i.e. double surnames –> Sir W.

Stop Jeroming!: A term given to pitchers who are constantly performing poorly. Created in honor of Jerome Williams.

Stop Being So Wily!: Since Jerome Williams is out of a starting job, the term now uses Wily Peralta as its foundation.

The Big Apple: Bartolo Colon‘s nickname.

The Giant Peach: Bartolo Colon’s new nickname now that he’s moved from New York to Atlanta.

The Balls Have Dropped: When a mediocre young pitcher who had started off his season performing well finally produces a dud, becoming the true man that he is.

The Deuce of Chicago: Dan Haren‘s nickname. Formerly the Ace of Miami before getting traded at the 2015 deadline.

The Dirty Cheerleader: Drew Pomeranz‘s nickname.  He’s pitching great = Dirty, Pom Pom = Cheerleader.

TEEs: Stands for The End of an ERA – plural since it’s a group of them. It represents pitchers who are giving owners a low ERA despite every indication that they should be holding a 4.00 ERA+. They are big teases and shouldn’t be depended on to produce in the immediate future and beyond. Colby Lewis is the poster child, with guys like Zach Daviesand Martin Perez also leading the way in 2016.

Three-Fists Compromise: When you’re starting a pitcher hoping for a Win, good ERA and low WHIP while accepting that you’re not going to get any strikeouts (or saves obviously).  Inspired by Doug Fister.  He’s a special guy.

Toby: A middling pitcher who has little upside but a steady enough floor that may earn a spot on your roster just for some stability, but is to be avoided against tougher matchups. That guy who goes into work every day and gets the job done but he’s super boring and you don’t want to talk to him, like ever. You don’t even want to acknowledge that he works in the same company as everyone else. Named after The Office character of the same name.

Tobey Maguire: The nickname given to the best Toby performing at the time, since Maguire is the most prolific of all Tobys, despite the slight change of spelling. Also referred to as Spiderman.

Young Gun: A young pitcher who may make a strong fantasy impact in future seasons, but doesn’t know how to wield his weapons just yet and will shoot himself in the foot often in the short term.